Synesthetic

Apr 30

robfunderburk:

Gretchen picking out a gift for a friend of ours from some painting/collages I made in conjunction with posters for Mucca Pazza in 2011. Haven’t seen these in a while :o)  

robfunderburk:

bear-like figure moving around test 3/16/14 rgf 
Apr 30

robfunderburk:

bear-like figure moving around test 3/16/14 rgf 

Apr 30

robfunderburk:

Sketch portrait studies of poet/author James Dickey, for the May 2014 issue of Poetry Magazine(!!). Thanks a mil to Art Director Fred Sasaki

Posting love poems of all kinds today. Next up: Anne Sexton with jealous love. I.e.; jealous of THE DOG in “Your Face on the Dog’s neck.” (“My darling, why do you lean on her so?”)
Feb 14

Posting love poems of all kinds today. Next up: Anne Sexton with jealous love. I.e.; jealous of THE DOG in “Your Face on the Dog’s neck.” (“My darling, why do you lean on her so?”)

If anyone bothers me while I’m working on my thesis the next 6 months, this is the look they’ll get.
Dec 13

If anyone bothers me while I’m working on my thesis the next 6 months, this is the look they’ll get.

(via gifconnoisseur)

thereconstructionists:

Few artists have done more to reconstruct the course of contemporary culture than Patti Smith (b. December 30 1946). Celebrated as the “Godmother of Punk,” her musical influence reverberates across acclaimed artists from Garbage to Morrissey to Madonna, and Michael Stipe famously cited her as the core inspiration for founding R.E.M. As a poet and visual artist, she has explored with lyrical poignancy issues of irrepressible urgency, ranging from foreign policy to mortality.
Among Smith’s greatest feats it the systematic demolition of the the perilous and artificial divide between “high” and “low” culture. In 1978, her song “Because the Night” from the groundbreaking album Horses reached #13 on the Billboard 100 chart; in 2010, her remarkable memoir Just Kids earned her the National Book Award. William Blake and Arthur Rimbaud have inspired much of her music, which has moved generations of hearts and bodies across dance floors and mosh pits. In 2005, she was named a Commander of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture; in 2006, she brought down the house at CBGB’s with an extraordinary 3½-hour masterpiece of a performance. The following year, she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Allen Ginsberg once bought her a sandwich in the East Village after mistaking her for “a very pretty boy.”
In the decades between Horses (1975) and Banga (2012), Smith recorded nine other studio albums, delivered countless poetry readings, and authored a number of books, including the breathtaking The Coral Sea, which chronicles her grief over the loss of her onetime lover, lifelong friend, and comrade-in-artistic-arms Robert Mapplethorpe.
In Just Kids, which documents how Smith found her creative voice during her early life with Mapplethorpe when both were aspiring artists in New York City, she articulates the singular duality of her muse:

It’s the artist’s responsibility to balance mystical communication and the labor of creation.

Learn more: Just Kids | Wikipedia
Oct 16

thereconstructionists:

Few artists have done more to reconstruct the course of contemporary culture than Patti Smith (b. December 30 1946). Celebrated as the “Godmother of Punk,” her musical influence reverberates across acclaimed artists from Garbage to Morrissey to Madonna, and Michael Stipe famously cited her as the core inspiration for founding R.E.M. As a poet and visual artist, she has explored with lyrical poignancy issues of irrepressible urgency, ranging from foreign policy to mortality.

Among Smith’s greatest feats it the systematic demolition of the the perilous and artificial divide between “high” and “low” culture. In 1978, her song “Because the Night” from the groundbreaking album Horses reached #13 on the Billboard 100 chart; in 2010, her remarkable memoir Just Kids earned her the National Book Award. William Blake and Arthur Rimbaud have inspired much of her music, which has moved generations of hearts and bodies across dance floors and mosh pits. In 2005, she was named a Commander of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture; in 2006, she brought down the house at CBGB’s with an extraordinary 3½-hour masterpiece of a performance. The following year, she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Allen Ginsberg once bought her a sandwich in the East Village after mistaking her for “a very pretty boy.”

In the decades between Horses (1975) and Banga (2012), Smith recorded nine other studio albums, delivered countless poetry readings, and authored a number of books, including the breathtaking The Coral Sea, which chronicles her grief over the loss of her onetime lover, lifelong friend, and comrade-in-artistic-arms Robert Mapplethorpe.

In Just Kids, which documents how Smith found her creative voice during her early life with Mapplethorpe when both were aspiring artists in New York City, she articulates the singular duality of her muse:

It’s the artist’s responsibility to balance mystical communication and the labor of creation.

vicemag:

Josh Lovell tells us about his 3-week journey with Levi’s, Patti Smith, Thurston Moore, and Cold Cave. Explore More.
Oct 16

vicemag:

Josh Lovell tells us about his 3-week journey with Levi’s, Patti Smith, Thurston Moore, and Cold Cave. Explore More.

newyorker:

Alice Gregory on director Nicole Holofcener’s realistic style: http://nyr.kr/19l0HH5

“It makes sense that all of Holofcener’s films have been made independently: it’s hard to imagine her pitching such seemingly low-stakes stories. But most people’s lives aren’t very exciting, and it’s usually only idiots and psychopaths who seek out the kinds of extreme experiences that make for cinematic biographies. What Holofcener’s films lack in tension they make up for in the specificity of their realism.”

Above: Nicole Holofcener at the 2007 première of “Friends with Money.” Photograph by Mario Anzuoni/Reuters.
Sep 20

newyorker:

Alice Gregory on director Nicole Holofcener’s realistic style: http://nyr.kr/19l0HH5

“It makes sense that all of Holofcener’s films have been made independently: it’s hard to imagine her pitching such seemingly low-stakes stories. But most people’s lives aren’t very exciting, and it’s usually only idiots and psychopaths who seek out the kinds of extreme experiences that make for cinematic biographies. What Holofcener’s films lack in tension they make up for in the specificity of their realism.”

Above: Nicole Holofcener at the 2007 première of “Friends with Money.” Photograph by Mario Anzuoni/Reuters.

(Source: newyorker.com)

danchaon:

New story from Wigleaf: 
Alas, Behind the Garage Dan Chaon
Alas, behind the garage where the trash cans are, hunched and weeping, your cousin Glenna says she is pregnant and you are the only one she can tell.   You are ten—a boy—and she is fourteen; the two of you smoking grass. “It’s going to affect your little balls,” she’d said once. “You won’t be able to have babies.”  You let her smoke this one for free, the two of you passing it back and forth. Usually there’s a charge, even for relatives. Two or three dollars for a joint as long and skinny as a nail—and you go to the playgrounds and basketball courts and video game arcades and the county fair—which is where you once made more money than you could comfortably keep in your pocket, a wad of bills thicker than your fist. And you take the money back to your cousin Keith—who is Glenna’s twin brother who she can’t stand most of the time—and he gives you more of the joints to sell, which are like thin little cocoons that you keep in your pocket. And Keith has always said that he thinks Glenna will die before she is twenty. He doesn’t want her to die, but he still thinks she will. And Glenna saying that the guy is twenty years old and he already has a girlfriend who is seventeen and dropped out of high school and who plans to kick the shit out of Glenna if she ever finds her. And you say, “How do you know for sure?” You watch as the joint turns to ash, millimeter by millimeter. “Unless your stomach starts stretching out or whatever.” “Do you know what a period is?” she asks. You think of first grade. You think of learning how to write sentences. How beautiful and remarkable it was to learn the punctuation marks. It had made you so happy to make that dot at the end. You darkened it and darkened it with your pencil, until you broke right through the paper onto the blonde formica of your desk. “Sure—I know,” you say—although you know you don’t. But you will know enough—soon enough—and this crying and this whitewashed garage wall and these black bags full of your dad’s beer cans are part of what you will know—and you sit down cross-legged and she wants you to press your palms against her palms—and so you do. The only comfort in life is going on with it.
Sep 20

danchaon:

New story from Wigleaf: 

Alas, Behind the Garage
Dan Chaon

Alas, behind the garage where the trash cans are, hunched and weeping, your cousin Glenna says she is pregnant and you are the only one she can tell.
 
You are ten—a boy—and she is fourteen; the two of you smoking grass.

“It’s going to affect your little balls,” she’d said once. “You won’t be able to have babies.”

You let her smoke this one for free, the two of you passing it back and forth. Usually there’s a charge, even for relatives. Two or three dollars for a joint as long and skinny as a nail—and you go to the playgrounds and basketball courts and video game arcades and the county fair—which is where you once made more money than you could comfortably keep in your pocket, a wad of bills thicker than your fist.

And you take the money back to your cousin Keith—who is Glenna’s twin brother who she can’t stand most of the time—and he gives you more of the joints to sell, which are like thin little cocoons that you keep in your pocket.

And Keith has always said that he thinks Glenna will die before she is twenty. He doesn’t want her to die, but he still thinks she will.

And Glenna saying that the guy is twenty years old and he already has a girlfriend who is seventeen and dropped out of high school and who plans to kick the shit out of Glenna if she ever finds her.

And you say, “How do you know for sure?” You watch as the joint turns to ash, millimeter by millimeter. “Unless your stomach starts stretching out or whatever.”

“Do you know what a period is?” she asks.

You think of first grade. You think of learning how to write sentences. How beautiful and remarkable it was to learn the punctuation marks. It had made you so happy to make that dot at the end. You darkened it and darkened it with your pencil, until you broke right through the paper onto the blonde formica of your desk.

“Sure—I know,” you say—although you know you don’t. But you will know enough—soon enough—and this crying and this whitewashed garage wall and these black bags full of your dad’s beer cans are part of what you will know—and you sit down cross-legged and she wants you to press your palms against her palms—and so you do. The only comfort in life is going on with it.

"Build gaps in your life. Pauses. Proper pauses."

-

Advice from Thom Yorke, from Esquire’s What I’ve Learned series – a fine addition to our ongoing archive of wisdom to live by.

Complement with Annie Dillard on presence over productivity

(via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

Sep 20
Sep 10

thenearsightedmonkey:

Ivan Brunetti talks about his book, “Cartooning, Philosophy and Practice”

The “Making Comics” class at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is using it all semester. It’s one little book with every single thing you need if you want to make some too.

"The way people use a place mirrors expectations."

- The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces (via explore-blog)

.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

Aug 29
weirdvintage:

Helen Keller “seeing” Charlie Chaplin through touch, circa 1919 (via)
Jul 30

weirdvintage:

Helen Keller “seeing” Charlie Chaplin through touch, circa 1919 (via)

(via heeryiggohoo)

vagabondmaurice:


…believe that the sort of life you wish to live is, at this very moment, just waiting for you to summon it up. And when you wish for it, you begin moving toward it, and it, in turn, begins moving toward you.
-Suzan Lori Parks
Jul 12

vagabondmaurice:

…believe that the sort of life you wish to live is, at this very moment, just waiting for you to summon it up. And when you wish for it, you begin moving toward it, and it, in turn, begins moving toward you.

-Suzan Lori Parks